Emerald Kempinski

Luxury Resort Debuts on Man-Made Island

The Emerald Palace Kempinski Dubai opens this week on the West Crescent of the Palm Jumeirah.

Designed to recreate the elegance and luxury of the palaces of Europe, the five-star Emerald Palace Kempinski Dubai opens this week on one of Dubai’s man-made islands in the Arabian Gulf.  The resort has 391 guest rooms and suites, and eight four-bedroom beachfront villas, each with a private pool.

Rooms begin at 200 square feet and boast butler service, a balcony, a choice of gold or platinum furnishings, and views of either the Gulf or the Dubai city skyline across the Palm Lagoon. 

Meeting space can accommodate up to 2,800 guests for cocktails on the Grand Lawn or 220 in one of the exhibit halls. The Grand Salon Maximillian ballroom can host 250 attendees for a banquet or 440 theater-style and is decorated with silk tapestries and Swarovski crystal while offering views of both sides of the island. There are eight meeting venues in total including an executive boardroom and two exhibition rooms. Three event lawns and a private beach are also available for bookings. Celebrity chef Alain Ducasse’s restaurant MIX is one of five restaurants on the property, and there are three bars where international guests can drink alcohol.

The resort sits on a white sand beach and is home to the largest indoor swimming pool in Dubai, an outdoor swimming pool, a nine-hole putting green, an 80-seat private movie theater, and a nearly 10,000-square-foot Cinq Mondes spa, wellness center, and yoga studio.

The neoclassical building features 5 Palladian domes and a marble-columned façade. Inside, the hotel evokes the high-ceilinged elegance of an 18th-century royal residence with gold-leaf fixtures, crystal chandeliers, and floor-to-ceiling windows to bring in natural light.

The property is accessible by bridge from the mainland and is 35 minutes from Dubai International Airport. 

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish