Dixon london

A Handcuff Chandelier at Your Next Meeting or Incentive? Sure!

A new Central London hotel incorporates its criminal past into the design.

Marriott’s Autograph Collection has introduced a unique luxury hotel in Central London that's close to the foot of Tower Bridge. The Dixon Tower Bridge is located in a former magistrate’s courthouse and police station built in 1905, and the property's transformation integrated historic artifacts such as benches with graffiti from prisoners held in the dock, the keys to jail cell doors, and original decorative elements from the Edwardian building’s former life. 

The hotel is named for the building’s former architect, John Dixon Butler. There are 183 guest rooms and 10 suites, including the 678-square-foot Orwell Suite with views of the Shard building. All guest rooms feature high ceilings and decorative plasterwork and city views. The property also has two meeting rooms of 800 square feet each. The first, named The Dock, is entered via a staircase which once led prisoners from their cells to the magistrate to hear their fate; the second, named Chambers, has a 100-year-old skylight and restored wood paneling.

What's more, the former courtroom has been transformed into the hotel's bar, featuring the original Edwardian oak wall panels and the judge’s bench. And a chandelier made entirely of handcuffs hangs above the lobby's main staircase as an arresting decorative piece. 

 

The property’s signature restaurant, Provisioners, features a combination of British classics and healthy Mediterranean dishes. The hotel has its own coffee brand, Shakedown, and features artists’ interpretation of well-known locals such as Charlie Chaplin as well as vintage mugshots.

The Dixon Tower Bridge is within walking distance of the Thames River, the Tower of London and Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre.

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